Problems & Disorders

In my practice, I use psychiatric medication and/or psychotherapy to alleviate the emotional and physical pain caused by a variety of mental health issues.

Below you will find a list of conditions that I diagnose and specialize in treating. Clicking on a specific disorder will take you to a seperate page which provides a more detailed explanation of each condition.

People with depression often:

  • Have lasting feelings of sadness and hopelessness.
  • Don't want to do things they used to find interesting or fun.
  • Feel helpless, unworthy, and guilty.
  • Don't look forward to anything; nothing in life excites them.
  • Are pessimistic; have a negative outlook.
  • Obsess about regrets in life.
  • Aren't motivated to do anything.
  • Have less energy; can't concentrate.
  • Have more physical complaints.
  • Have problems with sleep; either sleeping more, waking early, or having disrupted sleep.
  • Don't feel interested in sex.
  • Have a change in appetite; either eating more or less.
  • Have uncontrollable crying spells.
  • Isolate from family and friends.
  • Avoid interacting with people.
  • Have a hard time making decisions.
  • Are unhappy with almost everything in their lives.
  • Think about death often.

People with symptoms of Bipolar Disorder often:

  • Experience mood swings (i.e., have periods of depression alternating with periods of elation).
  • Describe their manic periods as very distinct times in their lives when they had a lot of energy, slept much less, were more impulsive, spoke rapidly, had racing thoughts, were more irritable, could be more rageful, and felt much more confident to the point of grandiosity.
  • Feel as though they are on a roller coaster that just won't stop.
  • Have such chronic and severe depression that antidepressant medication is either not helpful or actually makes them feel worse.
  • Have used illegal substances to self medicate.
  • Have been overly promiscuous.
  • Have spent large sums of money that they did not have.
  • Have felt like they want to crawl out of their skin.
  • Have a family member who has Bipolar Disorder or frequent depressive episodes.
  • Have difficulty maintaining jobs and relationships.
  • Feel they have no control over their mood swings.
  • Feel different from other people.
  • Have road rage.
  • Can behave and think very irrationally.
  • Frequently deny having Bipolar Disorder and stop taking their medication once they feel better.
  • Have had no response to anti-depressants, or felt worse on anti-depressants.
  • Have felt like they wanted to die to stop the inner turmoil.
  • Feel irritable constantly.
  • Have problems with sleep.

People with symptoms of Anxiety and Panic often:

  • Feel nervous and worry a great deal of the time.
  • Believe that bad things are going to happen to them or their loved ones.
  • Can′t concentrate.
  • Obsess about things.
  • Speak faster.
  • Are afraid to make the "wrong decisions" and are afraid to take risks.
  • Feel overly anxious around other people, when they have to speak in public, or to take a test.
  • Can′t get things done.
  • Feel like they are spinning.
  • Become depressed.
  • Worry excessively about what other people think, letting people down, not being perfect, or hurting someones feelings.
  • Need constant reassurance; doubt themselves constantly.
  • Feel helpless in stressful situations and have difficulty coping.
  • Feel overwhelmed easily.
  • Have a family member who suffers from anxiety or panic attacks.
  • Have headaches and numerous other physical complaints.
  • Avoid people and social situations to prevent feeling anxious.
  • Have panic attacks during which they feel the world is closing in on them, they feel completely out of control, experience shortness of breath, heart-racing, cold sweats, dizziness, and may even go to the emergency room thinking they are going to die.
  • Experience panic attacks while sleeping.
  • Experience panic attacks while driving.
  • Believe that there is something physically wrong with them.
  • Use alcohol to relax.
  • Are afraid of dying and death.

People with symptoms of ADHD often:

  • Have short attention ps; are easily distracted.
  • Behave impulsively.
  • Are restless, forgetful, and have low frustration tolerance.
  • Cannot stand in line.
  • Have difficulty completing tasks, reading a book, watching a movie.
  • Feel hyper.
  • Speak fast.
  • Have difficulty maintaining relationships.
  • Know they are intelligent but can't seem to succeed at what they want.
  • Have difficulty concentrating.
  • Daydream excessively.
  • Exert a lot of energy to do things that seem to come easily for others.
  • Have difficulty at school and work, tend to drop out of school, and have multiple jobs.
  • Have had a history of substance abuse.
  • Frequently lose or misplace things.
  • Feel 'scattered'.
  • Procrastinate a lot.
  • Start to question their intelligence.
  • Believe that their choices in life are limited.
  • Have a family member with similar characteristics.
  • Have low self-esteem; feel like they are a failure.
  • Become depressed.
  • Want to take control of their lives.
  • Say they feel calmer when they use illicit substances.

People with symptoms of OCD often:

  • Have recurring obsessions (troublesome and intrusive thoughts), such as concerns that they forgot to do something important, excessive thoughts about their health, or the wellbeing of others.
  • Have compulsions (repetitive behaviors or rituals, such as hand washing, counting, checking to see if doors are locked) which are often seen as senseless, but which they are unable to stop and interfere with their daily functioning.
  • Feel shame about their inability to control their thoughts and behaviors.
  • Feel anxious, especially when they try to stop their compulsive behaviors.
  • Are in constant turmoil.
  • Become depressed as they feel themselves losing control over their thoughts and behaviors.
  • Tend to be superstitious.
  • Are unable to leave their house on time.

People with addiction issues often:

  • Are physically and/or psychologically dependent on alcohol, cocaine, prescription drugs, heroin/opiates, or marijuana.
  • Are in denial of the severity of their addiction.
  • Cannot stop using drugs on their own.
  • Hide their substance use from others.
  • Build a tolerance to drugs and need higher and higher doses to feel the same effect (high).
  • Are unable to maintain relationships and employment due to their addiction.
  • Report that finding a way to obtain more drugs has become the most important thing in their lives.
  • Feel ashamed about their addiction.
  • Lie and steal to support their habit.
  • Feel their addiction is controlling them.

People with symptoms of eating disorders often:

  • Have distorted views of their bodies.
  • Starve themselves (Anorexia).
  • Binge eat and/or vomit/purge (Bulimia).
  • Eat compulsively.
  • Hide their eating habits.
  • Feel ashamed of their bodies.
  • Obsess about food throughout the day.
  • Feel ashamed about overeating.
  • Have food rituals.
  • View foods as either "bad" or "good."
  • Are overly critical of themselves.
  • Obsess about their weight.
  • Feel they cannot break the binge-starve cycle.

LGBT people often:

  • Are ambivalent about their sexual orientation.
  • Have shame and guilt surrounding their sexual preferences.
  • Are concerned about being harshly judged or stigmatized for their sexual orientation.
  • Are afraid to reveal their sexual identity.
  • Feel depressed, anxious, and alone.
  • Feel suicidal.
  • Hide their identity.
  • Pretend.
  • Deny who they are.
  • Lead a double life.
  • Punish themselves.

Contact me today to schedule an appointment at either my Westbury or Glen Cove office on Long Island, NY.